Pupil Premium Impact Statement 2016-17

"Below you will find the 2016-17 Impact Statement for Pupil Premium.  The information provided details the impact of each intervention area that is funded by Pupil Premium and the evidence held within school.  This is a live document and will be updated regularly as the needs of our school population changes.

 

If you require more information regarding the use of Pupil Premium within the school please contact the school where more information can be provided through the full Impact Statement."

 

West Lancashire Community High School

Pupil Premium

Impact Statement 2016-17

 

Child Looked After

 

Impact

  • All students have current PEP’s which have been rated OUTSTANDING by Lancashire Virtual Schools.
  • PEP’s develop positive relationships between carers and school to support social and emotional needs both within and beyond the school environment.
  • CLA students are making good progress in specified areas within the PEP document.
  • School regularly liaise with Social Care teams to ensure placement and education is benefitting the young people.
  • PEPSA funding has been used to fund a variety of social and emotional development activities beyond school including; laptops to complete homework, i-pad for communication skills, horse-riding opportunities, music lessons etc.

 

Evidence

  • Supporting statements from students.
  • Supporting statements from carers.
  • Feedback from Virtual Schools
  • PEP and PEPSA documentation.

 

 

TAF/TAC/CIN Support

 

Impact

  • A child centred approach is taken by the school and positive relationships are developed through multi-agency approaches.
  • School work closely with family and develop closer communicative links to ensure information is shared appropriately to support the young person.
  • Practice sharing has created an equilibrium of approaches to methodology to ensure that students’ academic, social and emotional needs are understood and supported effectively.
  • Clear targets are set to support the daily needs of the student and awareness from all parties allows the bigger picture to be seen to effectively manage social and emotional needs within school.

 

Evidence

  • Minutes of meetings (protected)
  • Email links
  • Referral forms.

 

 

Social Use Language Programme (SULP)

 

Impact

  • Students are screened at the beginning of the year in the Autumn Term and again in the Summer Term.
  • The initial screening is recorded by horizontal lines across the scoring boxes to show the current level of need and then vertical lines to show progress.
  • Accompanying the skill profile is a brief written description of each area which is colour coded to relate to the date of review to give a rational for the scoring.

 

Evidence

  • Student assessment and tracking.
  • Observations of SULP sessions and feedback.
  • Lesson planning and overview.
  • SULP target boards.

 

 

Y11 Work Experience

 

Impact

  • Students continue to have successful placements which help towards their transition to Post 16.
  • Pupils gain confidence, and feel more prepared in preparation for a weekly placement in Post 16.
  • Work experience also has a positive impact on behaviour and attendance with students being recognised for their positive behaviour during placement and on return to school.

 

 Evidence

  • Photographs
  • Work Experience booklets
  • Placement review forms.

 

 

Castlehead Residential

 

Impact

  • The residential visit has supported the building of positive relationships and friendships. Students work well together and support and encourage each other. Students work with and socialise with students they may not normally do in the school environment. Activities encourage individuals to build trust in one another. Sharing the residential experience, improved relationships between students and staff has also been observed.
  • The course programme allows for opportunities to develop communication and co-operation. This is especially seen when students give instructions to help others negotiate a task or keeping each other safe.
  • The residential visit supports transition as Key Stage 4 students build relationships with Post 16 students and staff.
  • Students take part in activities which may be unfamiliar to them or out of their usual comfort zone. Students challenge themselves and set themselves targets (for example how high they will climb). They show patience and resilience to persevere with an activity and conquer fears. Challenges or targets are achieved and often exceeded giving a great sense of achievement. This in turn contributes to a sense of wellbeing, confidence and improved self-esteem. Students often show pride in their own and each other’s successes.
  • Students generally display positive behaviour whilst on the residential visit. They manage their own behaviour well in different situations and environments.
  • During the visit, students have opportunities to develop independence and develop organisational skills through preparing their own packed lunches and hot drinks, choosing appropriate clothing for the day/activities ahead and managing their time. On return, these skills are transferred and students are more independent in organising themselves.
  • At the heart of the residential visit is the opportunity for students and staff to share enjoyment and experiences which are often remembered and talked about for some time after the visit.

 

Evidence

  • Course Programme
  • Photos
  • Newsletter
  • Posts on the PTA Facebook page
  • PSD books (P16)

 

 

Alternate and Bespoke Curriculums

 

Impact

  • The impact of creating and facilitating such bespoke packages is that students become regular attenders at their provision.
  • Students’ self-esteem and confidence grows as they enter new social opportunities and they are taught that school is a positive and safe place to be.
  • Students learn to self-manage and regulate their emotions and responses to them so that they can function with increased independence both within school and in the wider community.
  • Students engage in learning in a way that removes pressure and demand and they enter learning freely and engage fully in motivating and rewarding activities that match their needs.

 

Evidence

  • B Squared assessments.
  • Attendance records.
  • IEP Targets.
  • Bespoke Timetables.
  • Photographic evidence of engagement.
  • Summary review reports.
  • Teacher feedback.
  • Student voice feedback for review.

 

 

Oasis Time

 

Impact

  • Number of behaviour incidents at the start of the school day has significantly reduced.
  • Students offered choices and opportunities to start the school day in a positive manner allowing them to engage in the school day positively.
  • Students are actively encouraged to communicate and engage in appropriate social interactions in a structured and supported way.
  • Increased self-management of feelings and emotions through use of Check In system.

 

Evidence

  • Student feedback.
  • Check-In boards.
  • Behaviour records for morning routine.

 

 

Nurture

 

Impact

  • Students are developing greater emotional literacy skills and applying across the school environment.
  • Students gain self-awareness skills and use this to emotionally regulate and self-manage.
  • Clear targets are developed that focus on the students emotional needs and well-being and can be targeted in specific sessions.

 

Evidence

  • Boxhall assessment (Pre and Post).
  • Session Observations.
  • Pupil work and contributions.
  • Annual Reviews.
  • Behaviour records.

 

 

Welfare and Well-being

 

Impact

  • Student self-esteem and confidence is improved and this is reflected by positive engagement within the curriculum and through positive social interactions.
  • Reduction in behaviours for some students.
  • Welfare needs are supported regularly and health and wellbeing is improved.
  • Students attend school activities wearing appropriate clothing for the tasks and fit in to school community.

 

Evidence

  • Staff feedback
  • Annual review
  • Welfare forms
  • TA records

 

 

Cooking Provision

 

Impact

  • All students accessing cookery sessions develop a broad understanding of health and well-being through understanding their ingredients and their nutritional value.
  • Students recognise the ‘Eatwell Plate’ and understand the concept of a balanced diet.
  • Students access a range of ingredients and recipes and are given the opportunity to explore provenance and seasonality.
  • Students are able to recognise their own likes and dislikes and adapt recipes with confidence.
  • They develop fine motor skills through practical tasks such as cutting, whisking, slicing, chopping, mixing etc.
  • They apply some mathematical knowledge through measuring.
  • They develop skills that can be applied in many different contexts and become a lifelong learning skill.

 

Evidence

  • Food Technology Planning
  • Photographic Evidence
  • Student testimony
  • Timetable
  • Annual review documentation.